17 hours ago
Lauren Salkeld
TODAY

If you think of pickling as a time-consuming process that requires special equipment, you wouldn't be entirely wrong. But quick pickling is different. Quick pickles, also known as refrigerator pickles, are faster and easier to make, and call for very little kitchen gear beyond a pot and a jar or two.

Try Al's recipes for chow chow and bread and butter pickles for easy flavor

These recipes offer five simple ways to discover the fun and ease of quick pickles. In addition to classic dill cucumber pickles, you'll find recipes for pickled red onions, banh mi pickles, Japanese-style pickled cucumbers and pickled grapes. These won't keep quite as long as pickles that are canned and processed in a water bath, but most quick pickles will last about a week in the fridge. Of course, once you start enjoying quick pickles, you may find it hard to keep them around that long.

Classic Cucumber Dill Pickles Prep time: 5 Minutes

Servings:
1 quart

Ingredients



    • 1 cup white vinegar
    • 1 cup water
    • 4 cloves garlic, smashed and peeled
    • 1 tablespoon salt
    • 1 teaspoon sugar
    • teaspoon whole black peppercorns
    • teaspoon dill seed or 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
    • 4 Kirby cucumbers (about pound), trimmed and cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick slices



Preparation

Lauren Salkeld

You can use dill seed or fresh dill to make these quick pickles. The flavor differs slightly but the process is nearly identical. If using dill seed, bring it to a boil with the rest of the brine; if using fresh dill, wait and add it just before pouring the bring over the cucumbers.

Lauren Salkeld

In a medium saucepan, bring the vinegar, water, garlic, salt, sugar, peppercorns and dill seed (if using fresh dill, don't add it yet) to a boil, whisking occasionally to dissolve the salt and sugar. Let cool for a few minutes. If using chopped fresh dill, add it now.

Place the cucumber slices in 1 clean glass quart jar or 2 clean glass pint jars. Pour the brine over the cucumbers, leaving about inch of space at the top. Let cool at room temperature for about 1 hour. Screw on the lid, turn the jar upside-down a few times to distribute the brine and refrigerate at least overnight and up to 1 week.

If possible, occasionally flip the jar over to mix the brine and cucumbers around a bit.


Pickled Red Onions Prep time: 5 Minutes

Servings:
1 1/4 cups

Ingredients



    • cup white vinegar
    • 1 garlic clove, peeled and smashed
    • 1 small dried red chile
    • 1 bay leaf
    • 5 black peppercorns
    • 5 allspice berries
    • 1 tablespoon sugar
    • teaspoon salt
    • 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced



Preparation

Lauren Salkeld

These almost effortless pickles make the perfect topping for tacos and roasted meats. They're also great chopped and tossed into salads or rice dishes.

In a small saucepan, combine the vinegar, garlic, dried red chile, bay leaf, peppercorns, allspice berries, sugar and salt and bring to a boil, whisking occasionally to dissolve the sugar and salt. Add the red onion slices and stir for about 30 seconds to coat the onion in the vinegar mixture. Remove from the heat and let cool for 1 hour.

Lauren Salkeld

Transfer the onion slices to 1 clean glass pint jar then pour the brine over them, leaving about inch of space at the top. Screw on the lid, turn the jar upside-down a few times to distribute the brine and refrigerate at least overnight and up to 1 week. If possible, occasionally flip the jar over to mix the brine and onions around a bit.


Vietnamese-Style Carrot and Daikon Radish Pickles (Banh Mi Pickles)

Servings:
3 cups

Ingredients



    • 1 medium daikon, peeled and cut into 3-inch-long, -inch-thick matchsticks
    • 1 large carrot, peeled and cut into 3-inch-long, -inch-thick matchsticks
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • cup plus 2 teaspoons sugar
    • 1 cup rice vinegar
    • 1 cup water



Preparation

Known as do chua, these Vietnamese pickles lend crisp, crunchy texture to banh mi sandwiches, but can also be eaten with rice or noodle dishes.

Lauren Salkeld

In a medium bowl, combine the carrot and daikon. Add the salt and 2 teaspoons of the sugar and massage into the vegetables until the daikon is flexible enough to bend in half without snapping (the opposite ends should touch), 2-3 minutes. Rinse the carrot and daikon under cold, running water, then drain and pat dry. Place the daikon and carrot in 1 clean glass quart jar or 2 clean glass pint jars.

In a medium bowl, combine the vinegar, water, and the remaining cup sugar and whisk to dissolve the sugar. Pour the brine over the daikon and carrots, leaving about inch of space at the top.

Screw on the lid, turn the jar upside down a few times to distribute the brine and refrigerate at least overnight and up to 1 week. If possible, occasionally flip the jar over to mix the brine and vegetables around a bit.

Lauren Salkeld

Pickled Grapes Prep time: 5 Minutes

Servings:
3 cups

Ingredients



    • 1 pound seedless red grapes
    • 1 cup red wine vinegar
    • 1 cup sugar
    • 1 2--inch stick cinnamon
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons yellow mustard seeds
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons whole black peppercorns
    • 1 teaspoon whole cloves
    • teaspoon salt



Preparation

Lauren Salkeld

Trimming the ends off the grapes helps the brine penetrate the fruit. Serve these alongside roasted or grilled meat, as an accompaniment for cheese or as a crostini topping.

Use a small sharp knife to cut a small slice off the stem end of each grape. Place the trimmed grapes in 1 clean glass quart jar or 2 clean glass pint jars.

Lauren Salkeld

In a small saucepan, bring the vinegar, sugar, cinnamon, mustard seeds, peppercorns, cloves and salt to a boil, whisking occasionally to dissolve the sugar. Let cool for a few minutes. Pour the brine over the grapes, leaving about inch of space at the top. Let cool at room temperature for about 1 hour.

Screw on the lid, turn the jar upside-down a few times to distribute the brine and refrigerate at least overnight and up to 1 week. If possible, occasionally flip the jar over to mix the brine and grapes around a bit.



http://www.today.com/food/4-ways-mak...ep-time-t42906